Thursday, August 11, 2005

Erratum


In a previous post, The Siren's Compleat Anatomy of Cinematic Badness, I cited Showgirls as Exhibit A for category number 5, "Howling Dogs for the Ages." That is incorrect. Exhibit A in this category is Red Dawn (1984). The Siren regrets the error. She thanks Spike TV for bringing this to her attention with a screening of Red Dawn last night, and for showing the movie the way it should be shown, with a little "SPIKE" logo in the bottom right-hand corner and lots of commercials for Ultimate Fighting. Posted by Picasa

17 comments:

katiedid said...

This is one my husband SWEARS I must see at least once. He says he just knows I'll find it hilarious. I will one of these days... I mean, with Patrick Swayze and C. Thomas Howell, how can I really go wrong? And how could the filmakers have thought they could've gone right?

Campaspe said...

It's well beyond the acting. The script, dear Katiedid, the script ... That said, I have seen it three times now. It's like a reverse Rules of the Game, where instead of finding something new to admire, you spot a new piece of absolute howling insanity with every viewing.

There is some rather nice scenery in the flick, I will say that.

Exiled in NJ said...

And yet to my late daughter, who was twelve in 1988, it was GREAT. With those two hunks in the lead, and with more action than Dirty Dancing, what was not to like? It must have been her third favorite film, behind The Lost Boys and some video she found of a Slayer concert at Movies Unlimited, which had a retail store nearby.

Campaspe said...

Exiled: I am deeply sorry to see that adjective "late" in your post.

Peter Nellhaus said...

Peter Bart's book on his days at MGM includes some interesting information on the making of Red Dawn.

Tania said...

LMAO because we just watched part of this movie last night when we happened across it on one of our journeys through the channels, and Will stopped and said, "This is RED DAWN -- a very formative film in my adolescence," and then proceeded to cringe his way through the fifteen minutes of it we could stand, while laughing at him the whole time.

Atreau said...

I've never even heard of that movie but remember those two in The Outsiders. I remember when C. Thomas Howell was in Soul Man, I remember liking it as a kid but can't really imagine seeing it now as the storyline is so offensive!

Exiled in NJ said...

Thank you for the thought; I say 'late' so that people do not ask about her taste now. She died in a senseless accident the day after her 13th birthday; two nights before she watched "Willow" which was a cut above "Lost Boys," but she also loved to watch "Excalibur" with me also.

"Red Dawn" is just one of many "Hunk and Testerone" films that we repent from once we reach a certain age.

Campaspe said...

Peter: Interesting? I'll bet! The story conferences must have been something else. I was a teenager when this thing was released but it still struck me as ridiculous.

Atreau: One could get offended at some stuff in Red Dawn (especially if you're Russian) but basically it's just too silly.

Tania: So happy to see you here. I do not understand what men see in this movie. If I were a typical, slightly geeky teen male, I would have walked out the second the quarterback takes over from the Student Council president. The jocks shall inherit the earth. That's actually the scariest premise in the movie.

surlyh said...

Bad but thinks it's Good is the most interesting category to me. I despise the Mystery Science Theatre habit of laughing at the old. I am always getting into it with idiots who dismiss an old film for it's cliches, yet can't recognize the current shock-and-awful crap crop of 100 million dollar losers and it's attendant cliches. At least the typical cliched old film is a failed film about people, I say, and not a bloated, deafening car-ad-slick mess about exploding, chasing, transforming, killing...

Campaspe said...

Exiled: I am truly sorry; I can't even imagine such a loss.

I am not sure one does repent from the movies of adolescence. I never liked Red Dawn in the first place so it's easy for me to make fun of it now. But I have great affection for "Pretty in Pink" and still sneak a look at my favorite scenes when it pops up on the small screen.

surlyh said...

My nephew died a year ago, also at age 13. He loved Star Wars, Harry Potter, Godzilla and Doctor Who. I don't think he ever got around to an interest in girls.

Exiled in NJ said...

My heart goes out to you. You've been there so you know. I think my favorite memory is Lixie dragging my boss' wife and daughter to 'IJ and the Temple of Doom,' when a children's feature was sold out. The two little girls loved it; the wife almost fled in horror. I like to think Lixie would be posting here today.

*************

"Bad but thinks it's Good is the most interesting category to me." Exactly, but it isn't just the loud, car chase filled ones, but also the treacly, manipulative films with usually a score played on piano. Last week I had to sit through 2004's 'best love story seen in years.' My mind kept remembering a friend who leaped out of his seat after seeing "Love Story" and shouted, 'That's what he gets for marrying beneath his station." I saved myself by dozing off in parts; nothing to miss, I knew what would happen.

Then we have bankable stars who never grow. Whether he is Butch Cassidy, Hubbell, Finch-Hatton or Warren Justice, Redford is the same person. And while some roles are in the service of fine films, others are pure maniupulation.

Campaspe said...

H.: my deepest condolences to you as well. I completely agree about the difference between bad old movies and bad new ones. In my new post I mention that even the old B pictures often have amazingly fast, literate and even witty dialogue.

Exiled: yes, I object to having a film force Kleenex into my hand almost as much as I object to being assaulted by explosions.

surlyh said...

exiled: Thanks. While watching a Star Wars or Godzilla film on video together, my nephew would whisper the names of the various spacecraft as they sped by, or explain what the powers were of Mecha Godzilla.

Don't get me started on Redford--as a director he is the definition of Bad, but thinks he's Good. Who else could be so artistically insensitive and wrongheadedly liberal as to feature the magical "negro" character in Bagger Vance, just one of Redfords many crimes against film.

Campaspe said...

Now there is a movie that seemed woefully inadequate once I viewed it post-adolescence: Ordinary People. I still like Donald Sutherland in it quite a lot, though.

Tania said...

About what males see in it: I couldn't tell you, having seen only 15 minutes, just enough time to shout, "Wait--that old codger's giving guns AND girls to those hoodlums?" Although, come to think of it, that plot point alone could suffice to win the hearts of pubescent boys.