Monday, March 01, 2010

TCM Alerts: What the Siren Wants to Watch for March


So the Siren is just about recovered from the epic blogathon, and was just sort of casually nosing around the Turner Classic Movies schedule for March. Damn if her heart didn't have to be restarted several times. Keep that cable bill paid up, folks; March is choice. Several birthday tributes, two Borzages, Ginger Rogers, and the Siren's favorite Max Ophuls film. Tons of Kurosawa all month. The Siren may have to get vitamin D shots if she forgets to go out into the sunlight. All times are EST/EDT.

Here are the (mostly) not-on-DVD picks that the Siren wants to put on the DVR for March.

March 2
11:30 am The Spanish Main Frank Borzage swashbuckler with Paul Henreid, the thinking woman's Euro-accented bald heartthrob.

TCM is running John Garfield movies all day on March 4, what would have been the great actor's 97th birthday. The Siren will be recording

9:15 am Flowing Gold. A movie that Flickhead recommended long ago (which is good enough for the Siren), that co-stars Frances Farmer, an actor even more ill-fated than Garfield.

10:45 am Saturday's Children. Co-starring Anne Shirley, who was to have her own blacklist woes, and Claude Rains. Directed by the always-competent Vincent Sherman.

12:30 pm Out of the Fog. Costarring goddess Ida Lupino and directed by Anatole Litvak.

3:30 pm Between Two Worlds. Who would not want a white-suited, ledger-toting Sydney Greenstreet as the gatekeeper to the afterlife? In addition to Garfield there is a lovely turn by Eleanor Parker. The Siren really, really dug this one when she caught it a while back and wants to see it again.

March 7
10 am The Whole Town's Talking. One of the few John Ford films that has eluded the Siren so far, and starring Edward G. Robinson, no less. Bonus brilliance in the form of Jean Arthur.




That night, a great Hollywood on Hollywood selection: at 8 pm, The Oscar (the Siren hasn't seen that one, and it's supposed to be a pip); The Big Knife at 10:15 pm (want to see that one again); and Show People at 12:15 am (one of King Vidor's best films).

March 8
6 am The Story of Three Loves. One of those portmanteau movies the Siren can't wean herself off of. A must for Moira Shearer fans--she does a Red Shoes variation with James Mason; good parts for Pier Angeli and Leslie Caron.

March 9
8 am The Sisters. More Anatole Litvak, as well as Bette Davis and Errol Flynn.

March 12
6:15 pm. The Walking Stick. Don't know much about this one and it may be not very good at all; but it stars my old lust object David Hemmings, with Samantha Eggar, in a film version of a Winston Graham novel I loved as a teen.



March 15
Hold on to your hats, dear commenters: it's George Brent's birthday. And that can only mean--yes, you guessed it, an all-day George Brent marathon, something the whole world has been holding its breath for. Seriously, haven't you gotten fond of this man? I have. Anyway. Two Ruth Chattertons and some other goodies, but the real present for the Siren is

2.45 pm. Living on Velvet. The Siren's beloved Kay Francis, directed by Frank Borzage. Once she has this one recorded, the Siren can stop kicking herself for missing it when TCM ran dear Kay as Star of the Month back in 2008.



March 16
Not sure why, as it isn't her birthday--unless, like some other actresses we won't name, she had more than one--but they've got three pre-Codes starring Constance Cummings: The Guilty Generation at 6 am; The Big Timer, with poor doomed Thelma Todd, at 7:30 am; and The Mind Reader at 8:45 am, with Warren William, directed by Roy del Ruth.

March 23
All Kurosawa, all day. Just turn on the TV.

March 24
This was Ginger Rogers month on TCM; she is pretty well represented on home video so despite the Siren's well-known Rogers fandom she waited until this night to make recs. They are Vivacious Lady, directed by George Stevens, at 8 pm (not on DVD); Having Wonderful Time (at 1 am 3/25), a slight but savorable 1938 comedy that also has Douglas Fairbanks Jr. and Eve Arden; and Fifth Avenue Girl, directed by the gifted Gregory La Cava, at 2:15 am (3/25).

March 25
One more Ginger: Star of Midnight, at 9:45 am, with the peerless William Powell.

4:45 pm Madeleine Brilliant David Lean film about the most enticing of all "not proven" murderesses. Richly deserves to be seen by many more people.




March 27
STOP THE PRESSES.
10.15 Letter from an Unknown Woman. Max Ophuls directs Joan Fontaine in a movie that would easily make the Siren's top five of all time. Still not on Region 1 DVD. Turn off the phone, put the kids to bed early, shut down the computer, draw the shades, whatever it takes. Shown as part of an evening devoted to Louis Jourdan, who is turning 91 this year; his performance as Stefan was the best he ever gave.

March 28

12 pm The Light in the Piazza. Lovely romantic tale that for some bizarre reason is not on home video, despite a slavering fan base.

March 31 (actually April 1)
One last Ginger: Primrose Path, directed by La Cava. At 1:30 am.

77 comments:

Vanwall said...

Damn! A helluva month - March coming in like a lion with Garfield. I'm gonna fill up my hard-drive, and this'll be fun doin' it. "The Oscar" is less of a pip than it is a sour apple, but full of thick sliced ham and lots of it. "Living on Velvet", and "Letter From An Unknown Woman", just those two would make it a good March haul, and "The Light in the Piazza", a most unexpected book adapted for film in that period - it comes across as a travelogue with curious "Snake Pit" touchstones attached. Looks like a 30-day wonder ahead.

Arthur S. said...

The Story of Three Loves has one segment directed by Vincente Minnelli called Mademoiselle with Farley Granger and Leslie Caron that is highly regarded by many Minnelli enthusiasts. I haven't seen it myself but do see it.

My favourite Ophuls is The Reckless Moment for the time being but who can resist Joan Fontaine in Vienna?

I actually saw exclusively Japanese films the whole of last week including two Kurosawas - High and Low my favourite of his and Stray Dog which I saw for the first time. The latter is visually beautiful in a way that summons Sternberg and Welles and Mifune is incredibly young and handsome in that film as the former army vet turned detective. An incredibly radical genre film.

The Derelict said...

I've been dying for March to get here since I saw the schedule in early January. It's been torture having to get through this year's 31 Days of Oscar.

I CANNOT WAIT for Letter from an Unknown Woman. I've never seen it. If I lose power that day from snow or storm, I will fly down to Atlanta and demand TCM show it again immediately.

And Primrose Path is a fantastic Ginger movie. I fully believe she won the Oscar in 1940 as much for this film as for Kitty Foyle.

Rich said...

I'd be surprised if you didn't LOVE "The Whole Town's Talking." The best Frank Capra movie not directed by Capra (script by Riskin and Jo Swerling -- the 'Capra touches' are everywhere).

Elizabeth Kerri Mahon said...

Ooh, I am so excited. I used to have a book called Great Romantic Film and Letter from an Unknown Woman was one of them. I remember seeing late on TV, and thinking how in the world is this romantic? But I can't wait to see it again. Light in the Piazza? Is that similar to the Broadway musical? And the Oscar is awesome. More movies to crowd up my DVR. The day I switched to digital was the best day of my life.

Vanwall said...

Elizabeth - both film and Broadway musical were based on a 1960 novella of the same name, by Elizabeth Spencer. The book was somewhat more adult then either the film or the musical. The movie is beautifully filmed, and De Havilland and Brazzi are quite good.

gmoke said...

The Oscar is pure Harlan Ellison cheese and a lot of fun.

A full day of Kurosawa is a good start. When are we going to have a Kurosawa channel?

Missed my last chance to see Letter to an Unknown Woman when it was playing at the Harvard Film Archive a year or two ago so it would be good to see it again.

John Garfield is a touchstone for the lead character, the hippie PI Doc Sportello in Thomas Pynchon's most recent novel, _Inherent Vice_, which I just finished. Imaginary and real performances are mentioned.

Dave said...

In my humble opinion, the reason "The Whole Town's Talking" is the best non-Capra film is because Capra has nothing to do with it. Frank's ham-handed approach would have ruined this gem, for sure. Enjoy.

"The Oscar" is indeed a pip, but I much prefer the SCTV parody, starring Tony Bennett giving the world's most unconvincing performance as Tony Bennett.

Gloria said...

What wouldn't I give to see "The Whole Town's Talking" again!

It was one of my early cinematic treats. I must have been no older than eight and my father enticed me to see a film with "one helluva actor": Robinson, truly fantastic in his double role.

Right's owners of this film should go to hell for keepimg this movies remain in the unreleased DVD limbo.

Lou Lumenick said...

Amazon generally charges a stiff $27 for Warner Archive titles (and they don't offer the most recent releases) but The Story of Three Loves (along with Fifth Avenue Girl and Having Wonderful Time) are available directly from the Warner Archive website for $20, and were $13 apiece during its recent Valentine's Day promotion. The Archive also has Out of the Fog which also features Thomas Mitchell and John Qualen as Sheepshead Bay fisherman.

The Siren said...

Ah Lou, thanks for the correction. I love the Archives but damn if they don't confuse the hell out of me; the WB site is slow and crotchety and Amazon has things organized very oddly.

Vanwall, LOL at "sour apple" -- I really want to see this one, Boyd at the apex of his amazing handsomeness and lots of great 60s suds.

Arthur, Minnelli is one of my favorite directors and his segment is, I would say, "Big" in a much more mature and wistful vein. It's a delicate theme; I don't know where I'd rank it among his whole body of work but I will be most happy to see it again.

Flickhead said...

Lou, check Deep Discount DVD for their Warner Archive titles. I just picked up a few from them for $14.95 each, titles selling for $19.95 at WB and much higher at Amazon. A warning, however: Deep Discount's search box isn't very forthcoming with information. To get to the WB Archive film Carny at Deep Discount, the title alone didn't work, but typing in "Robbie Robertson" did. Go figure.

I haven't seen The Oscar since it was shown on ABC's Sunday Night Movie about forty years ago. To this day, I can still remember the last five minutes.

Sad to say, cable provider Comcast has removed TCM from my "basic cable" and has moved it to "extended basic cable," which they'll hook me up with for an additional $40 a month (!). As my nephew would say, "NFW!"

Back on that Sunday night while I was watching The Oscar I never thought they day would come when I'd have to pay to watch TV. Back then they used to show this at the movies.

Siren, thanks for remembering our Frances Farmer chat!

Flickhead said...

Typo correction to the above: "I never thought the day would come..."

The Siren said...

Derelict, I got some goodies from this year's 31 Days, including Kitty and Address Unknown, which turned out to be pretty good although they made it a Paul Lukas vehicle to the story's detriment. I can't believe you look that far ahead, I can just about plan things through Friday and then I have to draw the shades and compose myself on the fainting couch.

Rich, I don't know why I keep missing The Whole Town's Talking but I do, so I am really eager to see it.

Elizabeth, the Quirk book! that is one of my cinephile touchstone books; I even wrote it up a while back (if you want to see, it's somewhere under the Movie Books label on my sidebar). I have been trying to see all the movies in it and have about 8 or 9 left. I do think "Letter" is extremely romantic (and Romantic) but happy it is not.

The Siren said...

Gmoke, Pynchon has utterly defeated the Siren in the past but I have been eyeing that one largely because of the Garfield angle.

Gloria, I have absolutely no idea why the Ford isn't on video; if TCM is showing it then at least some of the rights must be unencumbered.

Dave, the SCTV segment sounds hilarious.

The Siren said...

Flickhead, that PSA -- oh my goodness!! I will check out Deep Discount DVD although it sounds even more maddening than the Warner site. The WB site has the worst filtering commands ever; you basically have to go through it one by one, otherwise it just tosses out a bunch of DVDs and of course the ones it doesn't bother to show are the ones I want.

Dan Oliver said...

Regarding "The Oscar", I tend to agree with Vanwall. You may want to have a martini or two before viewing; I think it may go down smoother that way. As for March 23, I'm taking a personal day at work so I can stay home and immerse myself in the early Kurosawa.

The Siren said...

Oh, and gentle commenters -- the George Brent day is really quite good all round. Lots of precodes; they are slanting it towards his early work.

Salty Dog said...

"The Mind Reader" with Warren William is one of this best heel characterizations, with a marvelous carny atmosphere and some plot turns that anticipate "Nightmare Alley" year later. Also as far as I am aware, this is only the second time it's been shown on TCM in about 5 years. I think I'm right about because I had wanted to burn a DVD of this since I got TCM as I remembered it from the early days of TNT, when Turner showed all the good movies there.

Charles Noland said...

Funny, the movie I was going to comment on, "The Oscar", seems to have made an impression of some sort on everyone who has seen it. I saw it quite a few years so I only remember it in general terms. I think overwrought, overblown, melodrama with a capital M-E-L-O etc. describes it. I think the volume is set at eleven for most of this one (dramatically speaking of course).

The Siren said...

Charles -- so you're saying it's teh awesome, yes? :D

Salty Dog, I know nothing about the Mind Reader but just from the year, cast and premise I was all over it. Now that you have chimed in I am super-all-over-it-with-chocolate-sauce.

Peter Nellhaus said...

". . . and introducing Tony Bennett as Hymie Kelly"! I guess Seamus Moskowitz would have been too ethnic. At least The Oscar has more definite running time than "The Oscars".

The Siren said...

The Oscar just keeps looking better...

Dan Callahan said...

Kael wrote that "The Oscar" is "of a lurid badness that has to be experienced," and she wasn't kidding. One of your favorites, Eleanor Parker, goes ALL OUT when denouncing Boyd. Hedda Hopper plays herself. Elke pouts. Jill St. John gyrates. And poor Tony Bennett tries to act. It's kind of the "Citizen Kane" of bad movies.

So glad that "Letter" will be on; my video of it officially bit the dust the last time I tried to watch it. I love the "love at first sight" scene at the beginning of "Living on Velvet."

And I'm looking forward to "The Heat's On," a hard-to-see Mae West.

Charles Noland said...

Awesome - that's the word for it.

Elizabeth Kerri Mahon said...

Siren, thanks for letting me know who the book is by. I bought in high school, and I too was working my way through the book. I lost it when all of my books were destroyed by snow (don't ask). I need to check Alibris to see if I can a new copy.

Vanwall, thanks for giving the heads up on Light on the Piazza, I definitely plan on watching it.

Yojimboen said...

A five-minute foretaste of the ersatz Sirk masterpiece The Oscar.
(ersatz = “Being a usually artificial and inferior substitute or imitation”.)

I’d lay money that the script sent to Tony Bennett had Jack Carson’s fingerprints all over it (but not beyond page seven).
The dialog in this clip is about one second out-of-synch; I think it actually adds to the fun.

SPOILER ALERT: do NOT click on the “The Oscar – Highlights” Youtube clip – it contains the world-famous climax scene, and you owe it to yourselves to see the entirety of this… perhaps the most thrillingly bad movie of all time.

The Derelict said...

Siren, the reason I know the TCM schedule so far in advance is because I am a massive dork.

And yeah, I recorded Kitty (very good, esp. Paulette Godard) and Address Unknown AND Seconds (haven't watched these yet) based on your recommendation so February wasn't too bad really. :)

And now it looks like I'm gonna have to record The Oscar too, based on all these comments!

John said...

THE OSCAR is a pure guilty pleasure! Lacking any screen charisma Tony Bennett is embarassingly bad as Hymie Kelly, Stephen Boyd's gofer. Boyd overacts his way throughout the entire film from low class strip joints to the top of the Hollywood heap. Unintentional laughs all the way. Loaded with walk on's from people who should have known better like Frank Sinatra, Bob Hope and many others. It is one of those bad movies you just have to love even as you sit there stunned by what you are watching.

Flickhead said...

I don't believe anyone's mentioned Russell Rouse, writer and director of The Oscar. Aside from directing the worthy film noirs The Well (1951), the dialog-free The Thief (1952) and New York Confidential (1955), he also wrote the screenplay for D.O.A. (1950). Rouse was also married to Flickhead heart throb Beverly Michaels, who starred in his Wicked Woman (1953).

After The Oscar, Rouse directed his last picture, Caper of the Golden Bulls (1967), a mid-60s heist movie again with Stephen Boyd, along with Yvette Mimmieux and yet another Flickhead heart throb, Giovanna "Boom Boom" Ralli. The picture also stars Vito Scotti and has music by Vic Mizzy, which should tell you where it's headed. It was a favorite of mine in '67; I saw it two or three times in the theater, but not since. However, I'm inclined to believe Leonard Maltin's correct in his review: "Lots of bull, but not much gold."

Keira said...

The Spanish Main (despite a Dutch pirate) is the sexiest movie I have ever seen. It made me love Paul Henreid with an unholy passion. When Maureen O'Hara stands there detailing her attributes (lips? figure?) I have a serious girl-crush.

The Siren said...

Keira, there have been some on here who have pooh-poohed Henreid's sex appeal so I am glad I'm not alone. He had intense eyes and a low, cultivated voice and you just know he'd know how to treat a lady, as in Now Voyager. I love The Spanish Main but then I am a sucker for pirate movies. I should try writing up a few.

Dan, "the Citizen Kane of bad movies" -- could the hype get any bigger, between this and John's endorsement (walk-ons! sweet!) and Yojimboen's telling me the climax is a hoot, I am running the risk of ditching the actual ceremony to stay home and watch Boyd claw his way to the top.

Flickhead, that last Rouse sounds worthwhile also.

Derelict, if you are a dork you are in good company with your hostess; just don't use the Wells fighting word "dweeb." All of these terms have nuance. I once sat with a table of computer (ahem) experts who went on at length about why "nerd" was a collegial term of affection but "geek" was an insult. (Or maybe it was the other way around.)

The Derelict said...

"Dweeb" is such a lame put down too. What era is Wells living in anyway? 1985? "Dweeb" is only acceptable when used in quoting The Breakfast Club.

If Wells had called us all "neo maxi zoom dweebies," then I might have cut him some slack, for style points. ;)

Vanwall said...

"The Oscar", like "Freaks", is one of those movies I never tell anything about other than general terms to anyone who hasn't seen it yet - I hate to spoil the bad goodness, or good badness as it were, for the prospective virginal mark, er, connoisseur of sliced ham with a little mustard?...whatever you wish to imagine the ambush victim to be.

Stacia at "She Blogged By Night" has an excellent defenestration of it, followed by augury:

http://www.shebloggedbynight.com/2008/08/oscar-1966-movies-about-movies.html

After the guts are pulled out, sliced and diced, and read by sages, the consensus is: amazingly over the top by all concerned, and rated "Oink", with a side of stinky.

gmoke said...

The latest Pynchon is not great Pynchon but there's a beautiful passage at the end of the book, something like his version of the ending of Fitzgerald's Gatsby:

"Doc got on the Santa Monica Freeway, and about the time he was making the transition to the San Diego southbound, the fog began its nightly roll inland. He pushed his hair off his face, turned up the radio volume, lit a Kool, sank back in a cruising slouch, and watched everything slowly disappear, the trees and shrubbery along the median, the yellow school-bus pool at Palms, the lights in the hills, the signs above the freeway that told you where you were, the planes descending to the airport. The third dimension grew less and less reliable - a row of four taillights ahead could either belong to two separate cars in adjoining lanes a safe distance away, or be a pair of double lights on the same vehicle, right up your nose, no way to tell. At first the fog blew in in separate sheets, but soon everything grew thick and uniform till all Doc could see were his headlight beams, like eyestalks of an extraterrestrial, aimed into the hushed whiteness ahead, and the lights on his dashboard, where the speedometer was the only way to tell how fast he was going.

"He crept along till he finally found another car to settle in behind. After a while in his rearview mirror he saw somebody else fall in behind him. He was in a convoy of unknown size, each car keeping the one ahead in taillight range, like a caravan in a desert of perception, gathered awhile for safety in getting across a patch of blindness. It was one of the few things he'd ever seen anybody in this town, except hippies, do for free."

If you want to start in on old Tom, give _The Crying of Lot 49_ a try. It's short and was his second book with a good deal of energy. I read everything (and I mean everything - at one time I looked up all the then uncollected stories and the NYTimes magazine article he once wrote) until after _Vineland_ which was disappointing. The Garfield references in the latest book are probably not enough to guarantee your enjoyment.

tomcervo said...

You can see Kurosawa any time, but the last time this was on was when TCM's Star of the Month was George Brent:

Monday, 3/15
12:15 PM Desirable (1934) An aging actress tries to keep her teen-aged daughter out of the public eye. Cast: Veree Teasdale, Jean Muir, George Brent. Dir: Archie Mayo. BW-68 mins

You can guess where it goes, but it does with so much more style than Woody Allen mustered.

Veree Teasdale is the icy blonde counterpoint to Kay Francis; they faced off in "First Lady". She retired soon afterwards to marry Adolph Menjou, and you can see the brittleness that attracted him.

Jean Muir is exactly what the title promised. She worked with Teasdale again in "Midsummer Night's Dream", Helena to Olivia deHavilland's Hermia. You can see the exact moment when Muir's kind of blonde chastity was replaced by Olivia's breathless allure. Her career continued to fade until it was extinguished by the blacklist. She had sent a telegram to the Moscow Arts Theatre congratulating them on an anniversary; a minor error, but by then she was unimportant enough to have it end her career.

Frank Conniff said...

Siren, please do not miss "The Oscar." It is, in my humble opinion, the Citizen Kane of bad movies.

DavidEhrenstein said...

Derelict, you should truly prepare yourself for Letter From An Umknown Woman. If you have blood in your veins it will decimate you.

I gather that Louis Jourdan is in poor health. When Leslie Caron was in town recently for various events his name never came up. While a "type" (French, sophisticated, unspeakably gorgeous) he had within his range a greater effect level than he's ever been given credit for. It's all over the place in Letter, and frankly Gigi wouldn't work without him. It's his film more than Caron's in many ways. All she has to do is be the charming gamine. He has to make a bored, upper-class playboy who never worked a day in his life emotionally compelling. And he does. His rendition of the title song alone is worthy of close attention.

I first saw Letter From an Unknown Woman on TV when I was the Joan Fontaine's character's age when she first meets Jorudan. And I was lusting after Jorudans of my own at the time. (We're talking New York in the Mad Men era, btw. Those were the days!)

In the Mademosille episode of Story of Three Loves, we're not just talking Farley Granger but

(wait for it)

RICKY NELSON!

It's "the irrepressible Ricky" (as he was billed on The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet) who wishes himself into being Farley the better to court Leslie.

You can pass out from the iconography alone!

Kate said...

The Oscar! Oh, bliss! Oh, Green Goddess dressing!! I haven't seen it in 30 years, so forgive me if I botch my favorite line:

Elke Sommer to Stephen Boyd: There's a verb for what I am!! Frustrated!!!!

Flickhead said...

Just out of curiosity, Siren (and since there's so much talk about The Oscar here), have you ever seen The Legend of Lylah Clare?

Maya said...

Siren, will I see you in Hollywood for the Classic Film Festival?

Catmommie said...

"The Oscar!" It's a zany, five-star hootfest! Do NOT miss it.

Dave said...

Yeah, are we going to see you at the Classic Film Fest?

The Derelict said...

David, I am thoroughly STOKED for "Letter from an Unknown Woman." I didn't think I could be any more excited, but your comment has done it. :)

Speaking of underrated Louis Jourdan, I think he's the best thing in Hitchcock's "Paradine Case," a definitely lesser effort from Hitch that Jourdan manages to make interesting and memorable with his performance.

Roderick Heath said...

Unfortunately, keeping that cable bill paid up is precisely what I'm having trouble with at the moment...

Vanwall said...

M Flickhead - "The Legend of Lylah Clare" is where Peter Finch calls Kim Novak "a piece of meat" - damn, I heard that all those years ago and it still sticks in my head. A distaff "The Oscar", competing for the bad name Oscar, as well, it's a movie where Finch and Novak chew the scenery 'til it's as short as their teeth are long, and brother, there was a dust bowl when they left. The slim pickins for Ernie Borgnine and a cast of hoozats is all the more noticeable because of the paucity of believable performances, much like "The Oscar", as well. Gee, thanks for reminding me, pal.

Flickhead said...

Van, please don't forget Ernest Borgnine as the studio chief: "I don't make 'films,' I make movies, dammit!"

gmoke said...

And Ernie B is in "The Oscar" too! Wotta guy!

Flickhead said...

Also, when Kim Novak is possessed (or whatever the situation -- the whole thing's a blur) her voice is dubbed. She kinda sounds like Lotte Lenya.

I only saw it once... which may be enough. Perhaps the most extreme example of Robert Aldrich's eccentric period.

Yojimboen said...

Lylah slices off another delicious piece of scenery!

DavidEhrenstein said...

Robert Thom wrote the original teleplay of The Legened of Lylah Clare, shot many years before Aldrech's big screen adaptation.

On TV Lylah Care was played by

(wait for it)

TUESDAY WELD!

The Siren said...

I would love to go the Classic Film fest but as 1. I don't drive, a pretty serious drawback to going to LA and 2. I would be paying my own ticket, I don't think it is going to happen, alas. I will live vicariously through you guys.

I haven't seen Lylah Clare. (I did see Fedora, however; there's one that never gets run anymore!) I even read the Tom Tryon "Crowned Heads" from which it was taken.

Maya said...

I don't drive either (have never had a license); but, I found a motel a few blocks from the lightrail, which takes only about 20 minutes to get to the venues. And you should have applied for accreditation, Siren, I'm sure you would have gotten it. If they gave it to me--a humble blogger--they would give it to you--a guest programmer--I'm sure!

Anyways, very sorry I won't get to meet you in person. But I can dream, can't I?

Vanwall said...

Flickhead -

Izzat the Driegroschenopfer Lotte, or the shoe-knife Lotte? Or both?

The Siren said...

Maya, does accreditation = plane fare? :D

Yojimboen said...

Oh, the humanity

Tonio Kruger said...

I really need to see The Whole Town's Talking. That sounds like a good movie...

Seriously, Siren, it might still be possible to see it the same way you once recommended your readers view Christmas Holiday. Fifth Avenue Girl, too. If you're interested in that sort of thing...

Then again if you can see it on cable, that would be good too.

Flickhead said...

Van: a little of both! Or maybe I'm all confused and the post-dubbed Bizarro World Lylah sounds like Mercedes McCambridge. Either way, she don't sound like the sad Carlotta nor even the mad Carlotta.

Yojimboen said...

In the trailer I posted above, Ms Novak's line: "Tell 'em Lylah's coming! As soon as she gets her harness on!!" is closer to George "Foghorn" Winslow than Lotte L.

Flickhead said...

Yes, that's it! You've got it!

JBW said...

Your noting the three Constance Cummings films recalls a felicitous 1972 night when I arrived in London, checked the theater listings, raced to the Old Vic, and saw Olivier's production of LONG DAY'S JOURNEY... from a standing-room perch which cost me the equivalent of 90 cents. Cummings was that production's Mary, and her heartbreaking performance which dominated the evening took on added resonance in '72 from her startling resemblance to Pat Nixon. Long before her husband's resignation, one could imagine the First Lady wandering through darkened White House rooms in an anesthetized blur.

Vanwall said...

Say, just noticed "The Happy Years" is on at 11:15 AM Pacific Time tomorrow, the 5th - It's not a bad version of Owen Johnson's The Lawrenceville Stories, about a private boys prep school and its denizens. The book is a wonderfully droll collection of coming-of-age stories, and separated from the later "Stover at Yale" stuff, (I'm not a big fan of "Dink" Stover, the protagonist in that series - he's an awful stick) they stand alone as the best collection of nicknames ever recorded - Hungry Smee, The Prodigious Hickey, Triumphant Egghead, Doc Macnooder, The Tennessee Shad - all fittingly bestowed, too. This film thankfully avoids the Yale end of things, and sticks with the Lawrenceville end of the humor spectrum.

There was a TV mini-series from 1986, with Zach Galligan and Edward Herrmann, based on the stories that was spot-on, and brilliantly done, an evocation of smart-ass schoolboys at mayhem. The triumphant pancake eating session is a high point, and not what you'd think.

I recommend the mini-series over the film, but the film does have it's nice Lawrenceville touches, and has the advantage of being available - the mini-series is in limbo somewhere.

I'm gonna tape the , just to be a completist, as I have the series on ancient Beta.

steve simels said...

Pardon me if this has already been discussed, or if everybody already knows the answer to this but --

TCM ran the uncut version of "Heaven's Gate" last night, and it looked worlds better than any video print I've ever seen, including the DVD I seem to recall looking at just a few years ago, which if memory serves was uncut.

Has a new video transfer been done and I missed the memo? Or was I hallucinating?

Edward said...

A few other notable movies on TCM this month, one good and two bad:

Heat Lightning, playing on Saturday the 13th. First saw this at Film Forum during a pre-code festival. Aline MacMahon and Ann Dvorak are respectively love-burned and love-starved sisters running a gas station out in the middle of the desert (and I bet for many of you I can stop right there) who get tangled up with bad boy Preston Foster. Don't want to overpraise it, but I found it dazzling in its modest little way.

At the end of the month, there's a rare starring role for Nigel Bruce, who had a much more interesting career than you might think. While it's definitely not a good movie, Free and Easy features him and Robert Cummings (?!) as a father-and-son team of ladies men; even though it's post-code the basic premise is breathtakingly sleazy, as with the Nigel Bruce/Kay Francis jaw-dropper Play Girl.

And, yeah, I'll be taping The Heat's On because I am crazy about Mae West; as always I'll watch it squinting, with one finger on the fast forward button.

Trish said...

I'm going to have to face it: I'm a Philistine. I don't have anything constructive to add to a conversation about "Letter from an Unknown Woman", but darn it, I do love my 'so-bad-they're-good' flicks. And "The Oscar" is one of my favourites, right up their with those other late 60s masterworks, "Hotel" and "Airport". I'm still waiting for "Doctor's Wives"...

Trish said...

Ahem, it has come to my attention that there is a pre-code Doctors' Wives as well (1931). Warner Baxter and Joan Bennett!!! I think I want that one even more than the 1971 flick!

Trish said...

Ahem, it has come to my attention that there is a pre-code Doctors' Wives as well (1931). Warner Baxter and Joan Bennett!!! I think I want that one even more than the 1971 flick!

panavia999 said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
panavia999 said...

You all have convinced me to watch The Oscar. I had no idea - I thought it was a epic peon to Hollywood. I never watch the Oscars or read about the results, so the whole idea passed me by. Really looking forward to it. I read the TCM article about the movie which posed the question: was it Stephen Boyds worst performance or his best. Dunno yet, but seeing how good Boyd was in most things, I assume he leaped at the chance to gnaw a giant hambone. THANKS EVERYONE!

cgeye said...

George Brent? *sigh*

And Primrose Path! Such a chewy film, with strong actresses and a seamy subject.

gmoke said...

http://www.salon.com/entertainment/movies/oscars/index.html?story=/ent/movies/film_salon/2010/03/05/the_oscar

A paean to "The Oscar."

Trish said...

Wonderful, gmoke! Nice to see an academic piece devoted to a terrible movie. All this after I've just watched "The Chase". Bliss.

I saw "The Story of Three Loves" a few months ago and highly recommend it.

The Siren said...

Oh Trish, you liked Three Loves too? that gladdens my heart; such an odd little movie. I will keep an eye out for either "Doctors' Wives."

CGEye, if I don't watch out Brent may become this blog's patron saint...

gmoke said...

You want a terrible movie? How about "Hurry Sundown"?

cgeye said...

... and Monday? Brace yourselves.

Miss Cyd Charisse Day.

Band Wagon, Brigadoon, It's Always Fair Weather, Meet Me In Las Vegas, Silk Stockings, in the AM. I don't think my heart can stand that much concentrated fabulousness.

I wonder whether a Return of Dr. X turn would have done Brent any good -- putting him in the opposite of a typecast role, and seeing how he ran with it.

Salty Dog (Bill) said...

Oh, yes another good one this month on TCM is "The Magician" a silent starring Paul Wegener and directed by Rex Ingram on Sunday the 14th at midnight.

Bill

Ginger and Roxy said...

sigh.....it was sooo glamorous!


XOX

g&r

gingerroxy.blogspot.com