Friday, April 30, 2010

Twitter and Other Links


For what it is worth, and as she re-reads her own contributions the Siren must truthfully answer “not much,” the Siren is on Twitter, until such time as she decides not to be on Twitter anymore. Right here: http:/twitter.com/selfstyldsiren. No second “e” in “selfstyldsiren.” The Siren’s rightful title was usurped by someone, hence at least part of her Bad Twitter Attitude.

And a while back the Siren received some very kind words from City Island director Raymond de Felitta, whom she is happy to call a friend, over at Salon.

We veer away now from self-promotion to what the Siren has been reading and watching around the Web, mostly a little out of date, but this is the Siren, so out of date is a way of life.

Further to our Bonjour Tristesse discussion, the Siren has been remiss in not thanking Vertigo's Psyche for putting up this link to part of an interview Jean Seberg did with Mike Wallace just before the movie's release. Her youth and beauty and the unconscious foreshadowing will send your heart careening into your ribcage.

So you think the Siren is mysterious, do you? Well, she isn't, she's just paranoid, which isn't really the same thing. You want mysterious, go with That Little Round-Headed Boy. We all know he's actually Larry Aydlette, but he comes and goes like the Shadow, leaving no archives, just fond memories of how his intelligence and wit lit up a subject like Burt Reynolds or, in this instance, the criminally underappreciated George Roy Hill. Start here and work your way through. You will not, repeat not be sorry.

The best analysis of the sublime Sullivan’s Travels you could ever hope to read, at David Cairns’ place. Read the comments too.

David Ehrenstein earns the envy of film lovers everywhere by interviewing the too-fabulous-for-words Anna Karina, right here in the LA Weekly.

Glenn Kenny on The Shanghai Gesture, at the Auteurs. She said it at Glenn’s place, the Siren will say it again here—god how I love this crazy-ass movie.

At Allure, Goldwyn’s Folly, the ill-starred Anna Sten, with an addendum here, as always with rare pictures from Operator_99’s vast collection.

Vadim Rizov gives You Can’t Take It With You the fisheye at the Indie Eye, and boy did that movie have it coming.

Raquelle at Out of the Past, true to the film her blog is named after, has been blogging like crazy about lesser-known corners in the career of Robert Mitchum: beautiful screen caps from Ryan’s Daughter (and a meditation on CGI), Mitchum’s son James in Thunder Road, and not one but two posts on Mitchum’s Calypso album (she’s a glutton for punishment, is Raquelle).

At L’Eclisse, a fun post on a topic the Siren loves: classic comfort movies.

At Carole & Co., How the Cold War Aided Film Preservation.

The Siren's latest Youtube obsession: The Tired Old Queen at the Movies. Steve Hayes is a familiar face to the Siren—we knew each other a while back, when he was doing a hilarious one-man show that included such gems as a dead-on imitation of Susan Hayward’s Brooklyn-Meets-Dublin accent mashup in the unforgettable Untamed. Now Steve is doing for Youtube what he used to do for cabaret, and I'm working my way through them. Favorite so far: the Queen's exegesis of Lana Turner's driving in The Bad and the Beautiful.

Finally, the Siren hasn’t mentioned this before, but she has a sister, and her sister has a blog. The Velveteen Hamster has nothing to do with movies; that obsessive gene passed mostly to the Siren. My sister’s blog has mostly to do with raising three boys—my nephews. Two have a serious medical condition, and the third is autistic. Please excuse the familial pride, and Rebecca, please excuse my language—but goddamn it, this is a beautiful post.

81 comments:

Edward said...

Thanks for the link to the Indie Eye. I've always had a special loathing in my heart for You Can't Take it With You. It's the most mechanical, un-spontaneous celebration of being "free spirited" ever contrived. Maybe the fact that it was written by a gay man who was actively at war with his own impulses has something to do with its creepy dissonance. All I know is I'd sure hate to be trapped in that fusty old house with Lionel Barrymore, Ann Miller and the rest of them.

The Siren said...

I couldn't agree more. Even as a movie-mad preteen I thought it was dreary as hell. How I managed to leave it off my list of 10 Worst Oscar winners I can't explain; must have just blocked it out.

Charles Noland said...

You both got the writing gene.

Seberg has maybe a slight Mia Farrow look to her. Funny to see Wallace smoking on camera during an interview, things have certainly changed in that department.

The Siren said...

The smoking struck me too. There it is, just swirling away. Thanks for the kind words about my sis. She does me proud in many ways.

Operator_99 said...

Thanks for a tip of the hat to my small corner cyberspace. So honored to be listed 1. By you, and 2. With other very talented bloggers. I really think film bloggers as a community have their act together, due no doubt, to their love and passion for cinema in all its varied aspects. PS- Thanks for the "Goldwyn's Folly" reference; had that in the original copy, but it got lost somewhere along the way.

DavidEhrenstein said...

"When Sam Goldwyn can
with great conviction
instruct Anna Sten in diction
then Anna shows
Anything Goes!"

Yojimboen said...

Yes, David, let’s hear it for Anna Sten, Anna Held, Vera (Hruba) Ralston, Signe Hasso, Gwili Andre, Belita, Vera Zorina, Elisabeth Bergner, (Zanuck “protégées”) Bella Darvi & Juliette Greco, and all the other “almost were”s; the ersatz Garbos, Dietrichs and Henies... Somebody should hold a festival.

The Siren said...

Now there's an idea. Throw Barbara Bel Geddes and Frances Farmer in there too, unless we think they would outclass the lot. Incidentally, I cannot BEAR Signe Hasso...lord she bugs me, in a European June Allyson kind of way.

Vanwall said...

Thanks for the links!

And I'll also throw in a good word for your sister's talents - you had a link to her before somehow, and I was impressed then.

I like the Steve Hayes vids, too!

I like George Roy Hill films, always have. His personal project, "The Great Waldo Pepper", is one of my favorite films ever, he got the early aviation angle perfectly, and in that instance among so many other films of his, he got amazing performances from a lot of peripheral actors and actresses - no one was better at using unknowns and supporting players so well.

I'm thinking about Twitter some more, but 120 characters or so, is so damn short. I have enough trouble with my short chapters for my serial updates on FB as it is.

The Siren said...

Yes, I linked to her on FB but I figured I might as well out her to my wider blog audience; she's never been anonymous. I think she's very much a cut above the usual run of motherhood blogger, even if my impartiality is questionable.

Yojimboen said...

I too like Geo Roy Hill – unfortunately he started directing features later (in his 40s) than he could have, so his filmography is short-ish.
But he did at least two blockbusters: Butch Cassidy & The Sting and his legend is secure. My personal faves are Henry Orient, Slapshot & Slaughterhouse-Five; all great scripts.

Re the other thing?
"I neither sow nor do I reap,
neither text, twitter nor tweak,
and all being well
or all being ill
thus it shall stay
till I reach Boot Hill"

Vanwall said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Vanwall said...

Regarding Hill's "Slap Shot", a dear to my heart film, as a long-time minor-league hockey fan, I was struck by the reception it received when it was released - much of the brouhaha was over the language the players used, and the overall casual attitude about sex and violence in the script, which was written and produced by Nancy Dowd, (a woman! horrors - writing a sports film about men!!!), which she was well acquainted with minor-league hockey through her brother, a player.

I was amazed by the almost shocked aspect to the criticism - they were clueless as to what really went on in the minors, or any pro sports team I guess. I had seen in action over the years many of the incidental players used in the film, especially the thugs at the end of the film, and I have to say, the violence was only slightly exaggerated, and the language toned down. I won't even compare it's language to real Spring Training for Major League Baseball, where I picked up a lot of pointers at swearing, while hanging around the outfield fence and the Pink Pony in Scottsdale.

I had a flashback to this film when I took my two small sons to see a local minor-minor-minor league team years later. At one point a long-haired visiting player and the local enforcer were getting into a jersey-grabfest, some college kid hollering, "Hit him with your purse, honey!", when WHAM! - the long-haired guy gets his face in the way of the plexiglass, breaking his nose, and a fan-spray of blood splashed across the glass. The boys' eyes bugged out, almost jumping out and rolling around on the floor, I swear. I looked down at the boys, "This isn't what hockey is all about, this like shinny, (a pick-up version of hockey) and real pro hockey has more skating than fighting." "Like Slap Shot?" one asked. "No, but Slap Shot is close, tho." They knew I'd grown up on minor-league games, and I was wearing my Roadrunners jacket that nite, even tho that team, like the Chiefs of "Slap Shot", was long dead. We watched the better local club come down like the Red Army team, flicking passes laterally back and forth, the eventual goal inevitable, and I said, "Now that's hockey!" Slap Shot was in it's own little universe.

Yojimboen said...

As I’m sure you know, the accuracy of the dialog owed much to the hidden tape recorder Nancy Dowd’s brother carried into the dressing rooms. Plus the sturm und drang over the violence and the language did tend to obscure some nicely measured performances by Newman, Lindsay Crouse and especially Melinda Dillon, who never got nearly the recognition she deserved (Close Encounters; Absence of Malice).

Yojimboen said...

P.S. Bad news, Jim Carrey’s remaking Slap Shot – due out 2012! Surprisingly, Dean Parisot’s directing. I thought Dean learned his lesson on the monumental clusterfuck (and industry-wide laughing-stock) entitled Fun With Dick and Jane.

Vanwall said...

M Yo - I heard about that. It'll be as stupid and puerile as the remake of "The Longest Yard". Bleh.

gmoke said...

If memory serves, Mike Wallace would do cigarette testimonials as part of his interview show in the early days.

Years later, he came down with high dudgeon on Linda Ellerbee when she did a commercial for coffee. "Journalistic integrity" my sweet pattootie.

I suspect Christopher Plummer got ole Mike right in "The Insider."

Yojimboen: Osa Massen, Viveca Lindfors and let's not forget Darryl Zanuck's last protege, Genevieve Gilles. I seem to remember her in a short subject that Zanuck may have produced. She wandered around a desert looking slim and shapely in a variety of mod-futuristic, Rudi Gernreich-like clothes.

Dave said...
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Dave said...

YCTIWY's biggest problem is that it turns a slight, if delightful, romp about individuality into Capracorn about Edward Arnold's dark night of the soul. It's one of the many reasons I hate Capra between 1935 and 1960.

And "Sullivan's Travels" may be sublime (and it is), but it's far from Sturges's best. I can think of at least four that are better and funnier.

The Siren said...

Slap Shot is an excellent movie, so much so that I liked it despite having just about zero interest in hockey, major, minor, Olympic or otherwise. (I have a love for football left over from my Alabama childhood and so I refused to go anywhere near The Longest Yard remake.) And Jim Carrey -- yeesh. Not a fan. Let's leave it at that.

Gmoke, Lindfors was a wonderful actress who just never got her due in American movies. Some years before her death she was brutally mugged in NY--her face was cut--and the lady's response in the press was to comment that she thought her attacker was going to be worse off in the juvenile justice system than she was with a cut-up face. Some people thought this was dippy liberalism at its worst; I thought it showed an extraordinary spirit, and I still do.

Two more for our festival, both of them women who wrote great books about Hollywood and may have been just too damn good for the place: Hildegard Knef and Mai Zetterling.

I may actually put this together. With proper credit to Yojimboen of course. :)

The Siren said...

Dave, I went back and tried to figure out why I didn't put YCTIWY on my 10 worst Best Picture Oscar list and evidently I just didn't remember it well; Vadim's post brought it all back though. A very forced movie with none of Capra's usual light touch. And the scene with Grandpa and the tax collector really is the utter freaking limit.

DavidEhrenstein said...

The World of Henry Orient holds a pecial place in my heart. it's a very accurate picture of New York High School girls in the early 60's. In fact a girl I went to shcool with ran around in a ratty old fur coat quite like the one Tippi Walker wears in the film. Great Elmber Bernstein score too.

Love Vivica Lindfors in Losey's These Are the Damned

TLRHB said...

Thanks for the mention! I'm glad to spark a little interest in Hill's filmography, especially Slap Shot and Henry Orient and Slaughterhouse-Five.

And, it's archived forever. I promise.

The Siren said...

You are most welcome. I do love your writing, and thanks for archiving. Now if you'd archive Burt my cup would runneth over.

Yojimboen said...

I would submit Viveca Lindfors’ sang-froid reaction to her mugging was less of political than national origin – scratch ‘dippy-liberalism’ to find Swedishness.

I was always quite fond of Fröken Lindfors; who remembers Alan Rudolph’s Welcome to L.A.? The only time in my several centuries of movie-going when I emerged from the theater (the Baronet, I think) not knowing whether it was one of the best films I’d ever seen, or one of the worst. Truth to tell, I’m still not sure.

In either case Viveca (the ex-Mrs Don Siegel, lest we forget) stole the show; notwithstanding an adorable turn by Sissy Spacek as a topless cleaning lady. The movie’s tagline, “The City of One-Night Stands”, may have played a small part in my decision to move here; but if it did, they lied. I want my money back.

The Siren said...

I don't know enough about Swedes to agree or disagree there; certainly it got some attention at the time. As for LA & false advertising, I rather hoped that NY would be like the party scene in Breakfast at Tiffany's, mixed with an apartment like How to Marry a Millionaire, and I wuz robbed as well.

Vanwall said...

Knef is one of my faves - she was fantastic in "Die Mörder sind unter uns", the only real Traumerfilmen I liked, as it didn't follow the usual "we were only following orders, but now we are peaceful little Deutsche volken" apologia of so many of that ilk. She had an influential hairstyle, too, like Louise Brooks; and in a weird twist like a fever-dream of Wellman's "Beggars of Life" - that starred Ms. Brooks dressed as a young man - Knef escaped rape by conquering Soviet soldiers and survived in a prison camp - a men's camp! - by dressing as a young man. She could sing better than most chanson warblers, too.

Say - as a bonus this month, TCM is playing a day of Clarence Brown films on the 10th, including "Intruder in the Dust", one of the greatest American films, IMHO, and the best Faulkner iteration, as well.

"The World of Henry Orient" is another of Hill's films that had unknowns as some of headliners - and no-one could've done any better.

La Faustin said...

Re YCTIWY’s ickiness : no need to involve Capra, the blame lies squarely with Kaufman and Hart. John Simon puts it beautifully (and for once addresses a worthier target than some unfortunate leading lady’s features) :

http://books.google.com/books?id=3bQBAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA89&lpg=PA89&dq=%22john+simon%22+%22new+york+magazine%22+%22you+can't+take+it+with+you%22&source=bl&ots=bnoUTLfqTN&sig=47FTK4zjWs7tpGOeEJe4XZtbTSU&hl=en&ei=SdjdS975KNSe_gbl6eSbBw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CAYQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=%22john%20simon%22%20%22new%20york%20magazine%22%20%22you%20can't%20take%20it%20with%20you%22&f=false

Vanwall said...

Hmmm. I meant Trümmerfilmen, sorry.

Yojimboen said...

Dear me, John Simon brings it all back – I saw that YCTIWY production, sort of. An old girlfriend called at the last minute – someone had given her two house seats – terrible seats, it turned out: first row, orchestra; looking upwards and not able to see the back half of the stage.

The only thing I remember about it was nearly getting into a fist-fight with my immediate neighbor, some visiting fireman, Texas, by the suit, who insisted on eating an immense (loudly crinkling Cellophane) bag of peanuts throughout most of the play. No amount of “Shh”-ing from a ten-foot radius; “Ahem!”s from Bess Flowers-types, throat clearings from Clarence Kolbs or angry stares from the players themselves slowed the chomping. Finally I tapped his arm and said in a loud stage whisper, “Could you at least eat with your mouth closed? The actors can’t hear their cues.”

(I’m not normally that quippy, but the theater was a block from The Algonquin, so I was probably channeling Mrs. P.)

Yojimboen said...

Second the motion, VW, Hildegard Knef had a special appeal for this provincial youth. Here she is in Snows of Kilimanjaro as The Countess Elizabeth – “Frigid Liz – the semi-iceberg of the semi-tropics.”
(Reportedly she and G. Peck melted a lot of ice off-set.)

Complete film here:

Bonus: Kick-ass score from Bernie H.

X. Trapnel said...

Signe Hasso=June Allyson? I dunno. My most enduring image of the former is as a dead Nazi in a man's suit.

YCTIWY. All true, all true, but still Mischa's finest hour.

Y, add Madeleine LeBeau (Mme Dalio for a bit) to the list. Gorgeous in her tiny bit in Hold Back the Dawn. I imagine like to Yvonne("Mugir ces féroces soldats?
Ils viennent jusque dans nos bras
this more than VL's "aux armes" gives me chills) and Rick in a Reunion in Brazzaville scenario.

DavidEhrenstein said...

Madeleine LeBeau makes a more than merely momorable appearance in 8 1/2 as an actress begging Guido to tell her about her character's motivation.

Meanwhile. . .

Lynn Redgrave R.I.P.

The Siren said...

XT, true dat - forgot about Hasso's splendid turn in The House on 92nd Street, a role Allyson could no more have pulled off than she could have replaced Ava Gardner in Mogambo. Mea culpa. But Hasso's the one thing I don't like about Heaven Can Wait and I couldn't stand her in A Double Life or A Scandal in Paris, either. Maybe I just hate her in costume, unless it's a Nazi costume.

As Bjorn said...

Not for actual posting, but simply to thank you for the link to your sister's beautiful post. My Asperger Syndrome daughter got kicked out of her dance class today, because she had a terrible meltdown Saturday (and the teacher is actually fully aware of AS and what it means so I guess it was really bad), and my wife got the email and is pretty sad. So I sent her that link. I love reading you, and Yojimboan is right that you both got the writing gene. Good stuff. Take care.

X. Trapnel said...

Siren,

Hasso is pretty good in The Seventh Cross, MGM's feeble attempt at Warner Bros. picture. Did anyone mention Karin Verne?

Apropos of nothing, but my endless adoration I'd like to note that last Sunday was Danielle Darrieux's birthday, 93 and still acting; the longest career, I believe in the history of film. Bonne anniversaire, chere Danielle.

Yojimboen said...

DD at 21.

X. Trapnel said...

Ah, Y, I LOVE that picture. I'm always delighted by the way DD's humor comes through in stills (I think this is from Retour a l'aube)

The Siren said...

All right gentlemen, the Siren is enabling your addiction here, because she shares it. :)

X. Trapnel said...

Merci! Merci!!, Merci!!!, MERCI!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Yojimboen said...

And at 91.

X. Trapnel said...

By the way (in the unlikely case that anyone noticed him), the oily gent is Andre Luguet, a French A. Menjou

X. Trapnel said...

Beautiful as ever (DD, not AL)

Yojimboen said...

AND she can sing.

X. Trapnel said...

Yes she can. There is a treasurable 2 disk compilation of her complete recordings 1931-1950. Not only does she sing comme un ange, each song is a winner (esp. Une Charade, Au Vent Leger, Adieu, Cherie). DD studied cello at the Paris Conservatory. Imagining her playing the Rachmaninoff cello sonata (or those of Brahms and Faure) I grow faint.

The Siren said...

How is it that each thread eventually lands on DD, I wonder? If I did a post on Every Which Way But Loose, could XT bring it around to the divine Danielle? *ponders*

X. Trapnel said...

Well, I checked the cast and crew of EWWBL on IMDB to see if I could create an acrostic or anagram; no results so far, but I shall press on.

Yojimboen said...

Easy as pie: Three moves. Eastwood and Burt Reynolds in City Heat; Reynolds and Deneuve in Hustle; Deneuve and DD in 8 Femmes (and five other films).

We used to play this game back in London Film School in the 60s, when Kevin Bacon was five years old.

X. Trapnel said...

The Bacon Bit is it? Well then, Gregory Walcott in EWWBL was in Captain Newman MD, starring G. Peck who was in The Boys from Brazil with James Mason who was DD's co-star in 5 Fingers

The Siren said...

Y., impressive. Anyway I adore that still. I may leave it up for quite a while. Joyeux anniversaire, Madame Darrieux.

Karen said...

As far as I'm concerned, you can leave that photo up forever. How is it possible not to adore Mme. D.?

That's an amazing photo of her at 91, as well--love the earrings!

On a different note, I am relieved to find my fellow commenters' reception of YCTIWY is not far from my own. While I am not a Capra-phobe by any measure, this film never felt as effortless as his others; you can feel everyone straining as hard as they can to be whimsical. It feels so leaden.

The Siren said...

Karen, good to have you back. Yes, leaden is le mot juste. There are any number of 30s comedies far more funny. I'd even rather watch Grant frantically flailing in Arsenic and Old Lace.

X. Trapnel said...

Karen,

"Free spirits" tend to be deeply annoying (another movie I'd like to kick is A Thousand Clowns). My favorite misfire in this regard is The Animal Kingdom with Ann Harding as the FS and Miss Myrna as The Convention-Bound Wife. Ha, ha, and ha.

On stage,the harmonica-based climax of YCTIWY with everyone doing their own FSed thing is no doubt supposed to elicit cries of "THIS is THEATER!" Maybe. It sure doesn't work on film. Besides Mischa Auer the only element of interest is L. Barrymore's uncanny resemblance to T.S. Eliot in his first appearance on crutches.

Yojimboen said...

Since he was donating his entire salary - $100,000 - to the war effort (coupled with Mr. Grant’s notorious parsimony), I’ve always felt he watching the clock on every take of Arsenic & Old Lace.

gmoke said...

When are you going to put the more recent picture of Danielle Darrieux on the masthead? Having just visited the last surviving member of my mother's generation in our family who is about to become 90, DD's visage in comparison is miraculous. And beautiful in a way that transcends the "pretty" of youth.

Yojimboen said...

L to R
Firmine Richard
Ludivine Sagnier
Virginie Ledoyen
Emmanuelle Béart
Isabelle Huppert
Fanny Ardant
Catherine Deneuve
and the youthful (only 85) DD
at the 8 Femmes press junket.

Karen said...

Y., you do realize that DD is wearing the exact same outfit, down to the corsage, in the photo where she's 91 as in the photo where she's 85?

DavidEhrenstein said...

Paul Vecchiali, a beyond brilliant French writer-director, virtually unknown outside France, is the world's biggest Danielle Darrieux fan. Among other things he owns the largest collection of Darrieux stills on earth. When he finally got the chance to make a film with her (En Haut des Marches in 1983) the first thing she did when she arrived on set was as "Alright -- where are they?" -- meaning those stills.

Vecchialli founded a school of low-budget small scale French filmmaking. He prided himself on making films almost entirely on the "advance sur recettes" granted by the government. His chielf acolyte -- equally unknown -- was the late, great Jean-Claude Guiguet whose masterpiece Les Passagers is one of the few French films Godard has cited recently as demanding serious veneration.

Vecchili hasn't made a film since 2006. Many of his recent works have been for TV. My particular favorite Vecchialli is Corps a Coeur with Helene Surgere -- a Sirk-like May-December romance using the Faure Requiem as its score.

The Siren said...

Gmoke, I see your point, but I honestly can't tear myself away from the one that's there now. I am just in love with this banner. Many thanks to Yojimboen.

X. Trapnel said...

Still working from night to morning on triple anaqramistic Baconian acrostics involving DD and EWWBL and am at impass as to what is encrypted in the formula Dan(iel) Duryea%@/**//# Danielle Darrieux. Only the Masons and the Trilateral Commission know.

David, is any of Vechialli's work readily available?

DavidEhrenstein said...

Not that I know of.

DavidEhrenstein said...

Anne Wiazemski interviews Danielle Darrieux

X. Trapnel said...

Anne Wiazemski is, incidently, the grandaughter of the great novelist Francois Mauriac. DD (from Bordeaux, Mauriac country) went to high school with his daughter. She always wanted to do a film of Therese Desqueroux (his chef d'ouevre along with The Desert of Love), which never happened. Our loss, though there is a version with Emmanuele Riva which may be the next best thing.

DavidEhrenstein said...

That version is by Georges Franju, and it's marvelous.

One of Vecchialli's most important films is Femmes Femmes (1974) Shot in 16 mm and black and white it stars Helene Surgere and Sonai Saviange as a pair of very small time actresses who work in theater and TV and share an apartment. Together they evoke all the important actresses in french cinema up to that point (Darrieux of course included).

Pier Paolo pasolini was so taken with it that he cast Surgere and Saviange in Salo and at one point they stop what they're doing as Sadean storytellers, loudly announce "Femmes Femmes!" and perform a scene from Vecchialli's film.

X. Trapnel said...

Nothing will ever get me to witness Salo again. I do admire Pasolini as a poet though

Yojimboen said...

Good eye, Karen, mea culpa! They're obviously from the same event, probably the press premiere of 8 Femmes in 2002. I found the head shot on a French fansite labelled "Danielle a 91 ans!"
They erred by six years. My fact-checker was out to lunch (or I was). But hot damn nonetheless, whodathunkit I would ever look at an 85-yr-old woman with Carterian 'lust in my heart'.

Karen said...

No worries, Y.! It was the flowers that grabbed my eye.

Trish said...

David - The World of Henry Orient holds a special place in my heart too! My twin and I saw this one at a Saturday matinee that didn't have a Harryhausen on the bill. I'm sure we were disappointed by that, but soon we were drawn into the celebrity worship of Val and Gil, and we strongly identified with them...

DavidEhrenstein said...

It's a great film about friendship on the edge of pubscent self-discovery.

I love the way the girls take up Henry Orient as an object of worship because they know he's a second-rate phony.

The film became the subject of a rather good, slightly obscure, Broadway msuical Henry Sweet Henry in which the title role was played by

(wait for it)

Don Ameche.

In the original film I love the weird nervous rhythms of Sellers scenes with the great Paula Prientis (who I run into frequnetly at screenings with her hubster of long-standing, Richard Benjamin.)

Trish said...

Okay, I'm going to duck after I write this, but I don't enjoy Frank Capra films. No, not even Mr. Smith Goes to Washington or It's a Wonderful Life. Arsenic and Old Lace is intolerable even with the presence of Cary Grant. I will tolerate Meet John Doe but only because I will watch anything with Gary Cooper.

Trish said...

Don Ameche! I love young Don, but he would have been well into middle age by then. Who played the gals?

DavidEhrenstein said...

According to the Wiki:

"Henry, Sweet Henry is a musical with a book by Nunnally Johnson and music and lyrics by Bob Merrill.

Based on the novel The World of Henry Orient by Johnson's daughter Nora and the subsequent film of the same name, the plot focuses on Valerie and Marian, two wealthy, love-struck teenagers who stalk an avant-garde composer and aging philanderer.

After twelve previews, the Broadway production, directed by George Roy Hill and choreographed by Michael Bennett, opened on October 23, 1967 at the Palace Theatre, where it ran for 80 performances. The cast included Don Ameche, Neva Small, Robin Wilson, Carol Bruce, Louise Lasser, Baayork Lee, Priscilla Lopez, Alice Playten, and Pia Zadora."

Playten (as one of the girls' schoolmates) had the show-stopper number.

Trish said...

Thanks so much, David. Lots of familiar names in the cast! I suppose 80 performances is a heck of a lot better than opening and closing on the same night. I wonder how much the "summer of love" had to do with the brevity of the show's run.

DavidEhrenstein said...

Here's Don Ameche's big number from th show, sung by hte wonderful Eric Comstock.

Karen said...

Oh, gosh, Alice Playten, there's a name from the past!

I was a massive, massive fan of the film; my sister and I saw it--during some suburban re-release it must have been, since I was 6 when it premiered--and were completely enamored. I believe we tried to model our own behavior on that of Val and Gil for a few weeks until we drove our mother insane. I must have been around 11 or 12 myself.

Here's the full cast info on the stage version:

http://www.ibdb.com/production.php?id=2963

DavidEhrenstein said...

The DP was Boris Kaufman -- Dziga vertov's brother who shot Vigo's Zero de Conduite and L'Atalante.

The scroe is by the great Elmer Bernstein.

I especially love the ending where the girls, reunited after vacation, sit before the bedroom mirror (ie. stare right into the camera) put on make-up and plan their next movie. They've just discovered what the adults identify as "REAL trouble" -- boys

gmoke said...

Siren, no need to change the masthead immediately. Sometime in the future, use the 85 year old picture of DD or some other classic beauty who has aged classically - Irene Pappas, for instance, or even Jeanne Moreau.

Pappas is also a fine singer. I recorded her a capella version of a Greek folksong from "A Talking Picture" by de Oliveira. I have a thing for late works by aged masters, the last recordings of Mississippi John Hurt, the London sessions of Thelonius Monk just before he went into seclusion, Joris Ivens' "A Tale of the Wind."

All I ever wanted to be was old and now I am getting there.

DavidEhrenstein said...

I saw Monk's last public performance at Carneige Hall. He was wonderful.

Among great "Late Period" works I treasure Gertrud, Seven Women, Triple Agent, Conversation Piece, That Obscure Object of Desire, The Voice of the Moon, and Mandadayo.

gmoke said...

"Madadayoo," which I saw at the Museum of Fine Arts because there didn't seem to be a general American release of Kurosawa's last film, is a book-end to "Ikiru." Kurosawa repeated some tropes from his early films in his later ones, most obviously in the dream sequence reused from "Drunken Angel" in "Kagemusha."

jsom said...

'You Can't Take it With You' is not a good film? Oh well....I enjoy it.

Kinda makes me glad I'm not a 'film critic' lol.

The Siren said...

Jsom, nobody gets rapped here for liking what they like. If you wanna defend the Capra, fire away!