Friday, October 15, 2010

"Two Grown Men Acting Like...Grown Men!"

Strictly to cheer our Friday, the Siren's favorite Joan Crawford cameo, with Doris Day looking lovely and Dennis Morgan as affable as always. And the great Jack Carson, who's 100% right about that gingham dress.

18 comments:

X. Trapnel said...

Can't imagine why this clip made me think of Vertigo: "Say, Judy thatsa pretty nice necklace ya got there; pretty nice neck too, ha, ha. Whereja get it? Looks kinda familiar."

Pussy Goes Grrr said...

This is such a great wake-up. Even though this movie's pretty goofy, its cameos are just so delightful - and the flashback to Mildred Pierce is very welcome, too.

Lou Lumenick said...

You gotta love any movie where King Vidor, Michael Curtiz and Raoul Walsh have cameos alongside Ronald Reagan, Eleanor Parker and Danny Kaye. I think Butler's work is generally very underrated -- "The Road to Morocco'' is a surrealist masterpiece. I recently saw "Sunnyside Up,'' which pretty much blows away any other musical released in '29.

DavidEhrenstein said...

Great fun.

Rather fascinating to see how short Crawford actually was. In cinematic iconography you'd swear she was ten feet tall.

Trish said...

I've never seen "It's a Great Feeling"! Crawford looks fantastic, except for the unflattering hairstyle.

I think Doris needs to go shopping with Ann Sheridan.

Frl. Irene Palfy said...

I love this scene! Joan Crawford is quite cute saying: "I do that in all my pictures." I really love her, Jack Carson & Doris Day! And I do love this film because of all these cameos!! :")

pvitari said...

Lou, how wonderful you loved Sunny Side Up! It was one of the big hits of the TCM fest for me. For anyone in the New York area, Sunny Side Up is going to screen at the Museum of Modern Art on Saturday, October 16, 1:30 p.m. and Saturday, November 13, 1 p.m. It's part of a series called To Save and Project: The Eighth MoMA International Festival of Film Preservation.

MOMA's Sunny Side Up page:
http://www.moma.org/visit/calendar/film_screenings/10565

The New York Times has an article today about the MOMA series. http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/15/movies/15restore.html?_r=1&ref=movies

Speaking of musicals, please visit http://paulasmoviepage.shutterfly.com :)

MrsHenryWindleVail said...

@Lou I love "Road To Morocco," which is my hands-down favorite in the series, but I wouldn't attribute its virtues to David Butler. I would attribute it more to the ongoing personalities of Crosby and Hope (and/or their writers) or the songwriting team Burke & Van Heusen or The Paramount Machine. It just seems to me that "Morocco" is the time it all "clicked."

A friend of mine contends that Victor Schertzinger -- the director of the first "Road" picture, significantly -- is the great uncredited auteur behind this series, that one can find much of the familiar "Road" apparatus in earlier Schertzinger films. I haven't seen enough Schertzinger, myself, to say yea or nay to that theory.

Rob said...

This is pure delight to watch, and proof that Joanie, when allowed, could do comedy as well as drama!
And proof that Jack carson was, well...CUTE!

Tom Block said...

It's also proof Joan could see how she looked to others and make fun of herself--that really is abandon, which is not a quality I think of when I think of Joan Crawford.

The trailers are up now for Todd Haynes' HBO miniseries of Mildred Pierce. Being someone who can't admire much more than the craft in the original (there's the problematic text, the incoherent text, and then there's Mildred Pierce), and also being someone who thinks Haynes has a hard time hitting a target any smaller than the broad side of a barn, I can't be more than an interested party at this time. I'm rooting for it, though.

The Siren said...

XT, I'm not sure either!

Pussy Goes Grrr, welcome. I am very fond of this movie, as I am of all the Morgan/Carson pairings.

Lou & Pvitari, I liked Sunny Side Up too.

David, it's true, she was tiny and you'd never know it. Ann Blyth, who was even tinier, talks about it in the TCM tribute that's run from time to time.

Trish, we should all go shopping with Ann.

Mrs HWV, Morocco is my favorite Hope/Crosy too.

Rob, I am crazy about Jack Carson. And yes, Joan could be very funny.

Tom, I adore Mildred Pierce and see no problems with the text. I am biding my time with the Haynes remake but deep down I know I won't get as much out of it.

Tom Block said...

>deep down I know I won't get as much out of it

Y'know, I almost asked you something the other day when you mentioned some contemporary movie being "out of [your] jurisdiction", and I'll ask now because it's something I'm dying to hear you talk about, and if (as I imagine you have) you've done so a million times already, I'll be glad to settle for the short version. Anyway...you seem to see a pretty big break in the continuum between the old studio pictures and pix from, say, the '60s on--I don't mean the well-documented historical changes, but in terms of what they mean to you in particular. Are there any modern pictures, or modern stars, you love as fully as the old ones--ones which you see having the same amount of craft and star wattage and emotional power, and whose behind-the-camera stories grip you as much as the old ones?

I mean, I'm in absolute and total agreement with you about how modern audiences (and actual filmmakers) are missing out on something huge and fundamental when they condescend to people like Curtiz and Crawford, or think of that type of work as these musty mothballs that are only good for a lark, and I'd also agree that that that lack of awareness wreaks serious damage on the movies being made today...I'm just struck by your singular focus on older pics. I think we're pretty damn far from living in any kind of Golden Age (except in terms of acting--we're absolutely wallowing in great actors today), but I could name scores of modern films which don't show any let-up in their craftsmanship or emotional resonance. There are also stars and films--say, George Clooney and "Michael Clayton"--which I think (knowing as much about you as I do) which are not just consistent with your aesthetic but seem like the kind of movie that could've easily sprung from one of the old studio moguls.

Anyway, you catch my drift. I'd love to hear whatever you have to say on the subject. I've wondered about it several times now...

hamletta said...

Meta-snark is a fine old tradition.

Dean Treadway said...

What a hilarious clip. And that first woman floating in with that shiny blue dress is a knockout. I can see why Jack Carson was distracted.

DavidEhrenstein said...

I can't imagine you "not getting much out of" THIS!

Todd's not doing a rote remake. It's going to be a 30's period film, without the quotes around it the way he did with the 50's in Far From Heaven. He's gone back to the James M. Cain original -- which was about the desperation of a women who struggled through the depression and the class hatred of her social-climbing daughter. Moreover it's a mini-series in foru parts so it will explore areas of the novel the Curtiz neevr touched.

But perhaps your problem is with Kate Winslet.

Jacques Rivette doesn't like her either.

Todd's obviously going to have a ton of fun with the opera scenes ( he's always been "The Queen of the Night" himself), and what gay boy doesn't want to shoot Guy Pearce in a roadster?

MrsHenryWindleVale said...

Wouldn't you just know that, after my comment about David Butler above, I'd discover that my beloved "Thank Your Lucky Stars" is *also* directed by Butler?

In the case of the latter, though, I'd still say that the Designated Auteur is either Warners itself or producer Mark Hellinger

DamienNYC said...

ANyone who loves Jack Carson is a friend of mine.

The Siren said...

Damian, seconded!